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Carillon Flashback March 8, 1999 – Machinist retires after 44 years in the same job – The Carillon

Vaseline 2 months ago

Almon Reimer remained retired for less than a day when he turned 65 a decade ago, so the staff at the Friesen Machine Shop in Steinbach won’t be too surprised if he returns to work one of these days after calling it quits. for the second time, a week ago.

Reimer, who turns 75 in October, has worked at the store on Friesen Avenue for 44 years and going to work in the morning has almost become a habit for him. Moreover, Steinbach’s oldest company would not be the same without its oldest employee.

Reflecting on his last day on the job a week ago, Reimer said his wife Annie has a number of jobs lined up for him at home, but he assured the Friesen brothers he would be ready to return to work whenever they needed him .

CARILLON ARCHIVE Almon Reimer takes a final turn on the Friesen Machine Shop's metal lathe as he announces his retirement for the second time, just months shy of his 75th birthday.

CARILLON ARCHIVE Almon Reimer takes a final turn on the Friesen Machine Shop’s metal lathe as he announces his retirement for the second time, just months shy of his 75th birthday.

Reimer, who has put 44 years of on-the-job training to good use, might start welding beautiful candlesticks, model airplanes and garden ornaments from now on, because he’s not quite ready to hang up the welding torch yet.

But welding as a hobby can be a pleasant change from the pins and sockets and bulldozer jobs that have become his specialty at Friesen over the years.

Reimer said he has worked in shops all his life, first with wood at the Plett Brothers box factory in Blumenort and later with metal at Steinbach Sheet Metal in Steinbach.

On March 1, 1955, he joined Friesen Machine for Barney and his brother Henry D. Friesen, and has been with the family business ever since.

The oldest Friesen employee today is Barney’s son Robert, who was “just a schoolboy” when Reimer took his place at the metal lathe in the Steinbach shop.

The experience gained at the box factory and the sheet metal company, where they also had a foundry and worked cast iron, has come in handy over the years.

At Friesen, Reimer did as much welding, fabrication and general repairs as he did on the metal lathe. Above all, the job was interesting, he says.

He remembers working on airplanes, draglines and all kinds of heavy equipment, often crawling under a machine in the yard to make difficult repairs.

A steady hand for fine welding, he has worked on intricate parts for the Manitoba telephone system and once even saw a clasp welded to a woman’s chain.

Reimer says it takes a lot of courage to say he’s quitting and has returned to work more than once.

“The Lord has given me good bosses and free time when I needed it. If they are in trouble, I am happy to help them.”

But Reimer remains modest about his 44 years in the same job. It may be close, but it’s not a record, he says.

Reimer shows off a small die-cast metal airplane with a spark plug fuselage, a wind chime and a metal candlestick as a few examples of the kinds of things he expects to spend in retirement.

The Friesens have already assured him that he can come to the store to work on his hobbies whenever he wants.