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Review Summary: CABARET AT THE KIT KAT CLUB opens on Broadway

Vaseline 2 months ago

Cabaret at the Kit Kat Club, directed by Rebecca Frecknell, opened tonight, Sunday, April 21, at the August Wilson Theater on Broadway. Cabaret features classical music by John Kander, lyrics by Fred Ebb and a book by Joe Masteroff based on the play by John Van Druten and stories by Christopher Isherwood.

The production stars Eddie Redmayne as ‘Emcee’, Gayle Rankin as ‘Sally Bowles’, Bebe Neuwirth as ‘Fraulein Schneider, Ato Blankson-Wood as ‘Clifford Bradshaw’, Steven Skybell as ‘Herr Schultz’, Henry Gottfried as ‘ Ernst Ludwig’. ,” and Natascia Diaz as “Fritzie/Kost.”

The cast of Cabaret also includes Gabi Campo as ‘Frenchie’, Ayla Ciccone-Burton as ‘Helga’, Colin Cunliffe as ‘Hans’, Marty Lauter as ‘Victor’, Loren Lester as ‘Herman/Max’, David Merino as ‘Lulu ‘. ,” Julian Ramos as “Bobby,” MiMi Scardulla as “Texas” and Paige Smallwood as “Rosie.” Swings include Hannah Florence, Pedro Garza, Christian Kidd, Corinne Munsch, Chloé Nadon-Enriquez and Karl Skyler Urban.

The Prologue Company, the dancers and musicians who welcome the public to the club, consists of dancers Alaïa, Iron Bryan, Will Ervin Jr., Sun Kim, Deja McNair and swings Ida Saki and Spencer James Weidie. The musicians of the Prologue are Brian Russell Carey (piano and bass), Francesca Dawis (violin), Keiji Ishiguri (dedicated substitute), Maeve Stier (accordion) and Michael Winograd (clarinet).

Cabaret at the Kit Kat Club also features club, stage and costume design by Tom Scutt and choreography by Julia Cheng.

Let’s see what the critics had to say!

Review Summary: CABARET AT THE KIT KAT CLUB Opens on Broadway – Updated Live!
Jesse Green, New York Times: Let me quickly add that Rebecca Frecknall’s production, seen for the first time in London, contains many beautiful and entertaining moments. Some films feature West End star Eddie Redmayne, as the macabre host of the Kit Kat Club (and probably your nightmares too). Some are from the new New York cast, including Gayle Rankin (as the decadent would-be chanteuse Sally Bowles) and Bebe Neuwirth and Steven Skybell (dignified and heartbreaking as an elderly couple). Others emerge from Frecknall’s own staging, which is spectacular in its additive mode, highlighting John Kander and Fred Ebb’s classic score and Joe Masteroff’s astonishingly solid book. Too often, a misguided attempt to revive the show breaks ribs.

Review Summary: CABARET AT THE KIT KAT CLUB Opens on Broadway – Updated Live!
Matt Windman, amNY: You might wonder whether the lengthy prologue enhances or detracts from the musical itself, which together lasts about four hours (imagine reading “Macbeth” in its entirety after attending “Sleep No More”) ‘) and or some of the other production choices and characterizations are too extreme. However, it all makes for an exciting, sharp and extremely detailed production.

Review Summary: CABARET AT THE KIT KAT CLUB Opens on Broadway – Updated Live!
Emlyn Travis, Entertainment Weekly: While the Emcee loves the Kit Kat Club’s endlessly talented ensemble, it’s easy to see why he has a special fondness for the cabaret’s headliner, Sally Bowles. Rankin is nothing short of spectacular as the showy performer, who knows when to turn on her character’s charming nature and when to pull back the curtain to reveal a weariness that makes it feel as if the hardships of life have been happening for centuries. pressing her shoulders. But when the curtain rises and the spotlight is on her, Rankin turns Sally into an unforgettable star with her coquettish renditions of “Don’t Tell Mama” and “Mein Herr.” However, it’s her rendition of “Maybe This Time,” soft and full of hopeful abandon, that really makes Sally’s final arc in the musical that much more poignant.

Review Summary: CABARET AT THE KIT KAT CLUB Opens on Broadway – Updated Live!Adam Feldman, TimeOut: High expectations can be a problem when you go to a Broadway show: you don’t always get what you hope for. It’s all too easy to expect great things when the show is a masterpiece like Cabaret: a thrilling and ultimately chilling portrayal of Berlin in the early 1930s, made into a classic film and excellent less than a decade ago has been revived. The risk of disappointment is even greater when the cast includes many actors you admire – led by Eddie Redmayne as host of the show’s decadent Kit Kat Club – and if the production, like this one, arrives on a wave of raves from London . To avoid this problem, I actively tried to lower my expectations before seeing the latest version of Cabaret. But my lowered expectations failed. They weren’t low enough.

Review Summary: CABARET AT THE KIT KAT CLUB Opens on Broadway – Updated Live!
Michael Musto, Village Voice: And then comes the show itself, which hasn’t upped the sexuality quotient, though it certainly has underlined what’s exaggerated. Everything that was extreme in previous productions is now even more extreme. As host of the Kit Kat Club, Oscar and Tony winner Eddie Redmayne must separate himself from two legends (Joel Gray and Alan Cumming); he does this with exaggerated hand gestures and head movements and with vocal tics that sometimes resemble those of Jerry Lewis. Redmayne sings the show’s signature tune, ‘Willkommen’, in brown leather culottes, long black gloves and a bright blue party hat (costumes by Tom Scutt, who also did the sets), and appears to have gone beyond the normal human range, instead going for a Cirque du Soleil meets crazy puppet effect that is often weird for the sake of weird. Each time Redmayne appears, the costumes get stranger, though his best moment vocally is when his Emcee, conservatively dressed as a Master Race type, stands still and smoothly sings the Nazi anthem “Tomorrow Belongs to Me,” to eerie effect. A succession of miniature wooden Redmayne dolls in the same garb (doll puppets, as it were) appear at the edges of the revolving stage as he sings, foreshadowing the moment later in the show when the entire cast storms the stage , dressed and looking like fascists.

Review Summary: CABARET AT THE KIT KAT CLUB Opens on Broadway – Updated Live!
Melissa Rose Bernardo, New York Stage Review: But Frecknall cleverly blurs the lines. The only thing we are really sure of is that we are in Weimar-era Berlin. When the Emcee sings the echoey, haunting Aryan anthem “Tomorrow Belongs to Me,” he wanders through a kind of dreamland populated by white men the size of a wooden doll. In “Maybe This Time,” as Sally imagines a different life for herself (“No more loser/Like the last time and the time before,” she sings), she’s technically in Cliff’s room, but she’s also in another liminal space. (The soul-searching songs “Maybe This Time” and “Cabaret” are Rankin’s most powerful songs.) At the end of “What Would You Do?” sings Fraulein Schneider atop a platform in the center of the stage. The lights on the tables are on – as if we are in the club watching a performance, and not the devastation of a woman who has just traded her happiness for her survival.

Review Summary: CABARET AT THE KIT KAT CLUB Opens on Broadway – Updated Live!
Frank Scheck, New York Theater Guide: As for the show itself (I know, it almost seems like an afterthought), it has been given an undeniably powerful, if somewhat imperfect, staging. One of its main strengths is the lead performances, or at least most of them, with Eddie Redmayne repeating his Olivier Award-winning performance (at least until early September) as the leering Emcee. He is not as menacing as Alan Cumming in the Mendes production, and at times seems vulnerable and almost cute. But the actor is certainly fascinating, using his angular physicality and androgynous looks to tremendous effect and using his natural charisma to such an extent that you can’t take your eyes off him. During many dramatic scenes involving the other characters, he lurks quietly at the edge of the stage, doing nothing but making it seem like everything.

Review Summary: CABARET AT THE KIT KAT CLUB Opens on Broadway – Updated Live!
Jonathan Mandell, New York Theater: Fortunately, there are two performances that do more than do their part to right the imbalance. Bebe Neuwirth is excellent as Fraulein Schneider, the landlady of the boarding house where Clifford rents a room; she draws attention to songs that wouldn’t normally be among the most memorable in the musical – “So What” and “What Would You Do” – that convey the real desperation and high stakes faced by people in Germany. Her performance is matched by Steven Skybell, as Herr Schultz, one of her boarders. The two older characters gently fall in love, accompanied by some beautiful melodies, ‘It Could’t Please Me More’ and ‘Married’. In the most effective scene in which the Emcee participates: he wraps a wine glass in a napkin and steps on it – central to the traditional Jewish wedding ritual – but it is not accompanied by a hurrah, but by a loud crash, darkness, the sound of breaking glass, and the lights come up to the flutter of what could literally be stage confetti, but hits like a foretaste of Kristallnacht.

Review Summary: CABARET AT THE KIT KAT CLUB Opens on Broadway – Updated Live!
Johnny Oleksinski, New York Post: Still, the expensive bells and whistles distract from what is a lackluster, overly bleak staging that’s often undermined by its own overwrought machinations. This two hour and forty-five minute musical is undeniably slick and clever and feels much longer than it should. That’s because, bizarrely for a production so determined to waste its audience, it hesitates to have too much fun itself.

Average rating: 62.2%

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